Who Is US Rep Cortez?

The biometric tests are complete.  We have the ear, dorsal hand vein, foot veins, and the supporting evidence of the grandmother is the same and her Chief of Staff is associated with both individuals.

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The biometric tests are complete.  We have the ear, dorsal hand vein, foot veins, and the supporting evidence of the grandmother is the same, and her Chief of Staff is seen with both Cortez and Korey.

But first, before you look at the images you must first get an understanding of what make-up can do please watch the following videos

Alexandria Ocasio Cortez is Tinsel Korey.

The Dorsal hand vein patterns are the same.

Veins in the feet are the same.

Most recent Video from Tinsel Corey

Voices are the same

Associates with the same people and the Grandmother is the same.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexandria_Ocasio-Cortez

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez[pron 1] (born October 13, 1989) is an American politician and educator.[2][3] She is the U.S. Representative-elect for New York’s 14th congressional district, elected on November 6, 2018.

On June 26, 2018, Ocasio-Cortez won the Democratic primary in New York’s 14th congressional district covering parts of the Bronx and Queens in New York City, defeating the incumbent Congressman, Democratic Caucus Chair Joe Crowley, in what was described as the biggest upset victory in the 2018 midterm election primaries.[9] Ocasio-Cortez is a member of the Democratic Socialists of America.[10]

When she takes office on January 3, 2019, at the age of 29, Ocasio-Cortez will be the youngest woman to serve in Congress in the history of the United States,[11] a distinction that had been previously held by New York Republican Elise Stefanik, who was elected at

Early life and education

Ocasio-Cortez was born in the BronxNew York City, on October 13, 1989, to Blanca Ocasio-Cortez (née Cortez) and Sergio Ocasio.[13] Her father, an architect of Puerto Rican descent, was born in the Bronx, while her mother was born in Puerto Rico.[14][15] Until age five, Ocasio-Cortez lived with her family in an apartment in the neighborhood of Parkchester.[15] The family then moved to a house in Yorktown Heights, a suburb in Westchester County.[15] Growing up, Ocasio-Cortez regularly visited her extended family in the Bronx.[16]

Ocasio-Cortez attended Yorktown High School, graduating in 2007,[17] where she won second prize in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair with a microbiology research project on the effect of antioxidants on C. elegans‘ lifespan.[18] As a result, the International Astronomical Union named a small asteroid after her: 23238 Ocasio-Cortez.[19][20] In high school, she took part in the National Hispanic Institute‘s Lorenzo de Zavala (LDZ) Youth Legislative Session. She later became the LDZ Secretary of State while she attended Boston University. Ocasio-Cortez had a John F. Lopez Fellowship.[21] In 2008, while Ocasio-Cortez was a sophomore at Boston University, her father died of lung cancer.[22][23] During college, she was an intern in the immigration office of U.S. Senator Ted Kennedy.[24] She graduated cum laude from Boston University’s College of Arts and Sciences in 2011 with a bachelor’s degree in international relations and a minor in economics.[21][25][26]

Ocasio-Cortez has described her background as working-class, and relates many of her political positions to it. When her father died intestate in 2008,[27] she became involved in a long probate battle to settle his estate. She has said that the experience helped her learn “firsthand how attorneys appointed by the court to administer an estate can enrich themselves at the expense of the families struggling to make sense of the bureaucracy”.[28]

Early career

After college, Ocasio-Cortez moved back to the Bronx, while she worked as a bartender in Manhattan and as a waitress in a taqueria. Her mother, meanwhile, cleaned houses and drove school buses. After her father’s death, Ocasio-Cortez and her mother struggled to fight foreclosure of their home.[29][30] With financial backing from Sunshine Bronx Business Incubator, she established a publishing firm, Brook Avenue Press, which specializes in children’s literature that portrays the Bronx in a positive light.[31] She worked as lead educational strategist at GAGEis, Inc.[32] Ocasio-Cortez was also an educator at the nonprofit National Hispanic Institute.[33] She served as its Educational Director of the 2017 Northeast Collegiate World Series, where she participated in a panel on Latino leadership.[21]

In the 2016 primary, Ocasio-Cortez worked as an organizer for Bernie Sanders’s 2016 presidential campaign.[34] After the general election, she traveled across America by car, visiting places such as Flint, Michigan, and Standing Rock, and speaking to people affected by the human rights violations related to the Flint water crisis and the Dakota Access Pipeline.[35] In an interview she recalled her visit to Standing Rock as a tipping point, saying that before that, she had felt that the only way to effectively run for office was if you had access to wealth, social influence, and power. But her visit to North Dakota, where she saw others “putting their whole lives and everything that they had on the line for the protection of their community”, inspired her to begin to work for her own community.[36]

U.S. House of Representatives

2018 election

Ocasio-Cortez was among a slate of nationwide Justice Democrats/Brand New Congress candidacy announcements live streamed on May 16, 2017.[37] In August 2017, she attended the Netroots Nation Conference in Atlanta, appearing on a panel with fellow candidates on “how to run a grassroots campaign that puts people above party”.[38][39]
Ocasio-Cortez was the first person since 2004 to challenge the Democratic Caucus Chair, Joe Crowley, in the Democratic primary. She faced a significant financial disadvantage, but said, “You can’t really beat big money with more money. You have to beat them with a totally different game.” Nearly 75% of her donations were small individual contributions, while less than one percent of Crowley’s contributions were.[28] The Ocasio-Cortez campaign spent $194,000 to the Crowley campaign’s $3.4 million.[40]

Ocasio-Cortez had not previously held elected office,[14] and her campaign video began with her saying “Women like me aren’t supposed to run for office.”[41]

On June 15, the candidates’ only face-to-face encounter during the campaign occurred on a local political talk show, Inside City Hall. The format was a joint interview conducted by Errol Louis, which NY1 characterized as a debate.[42] On June 18, a debate in the Bronx was scheduled, but Crowley did not participate. He sent former New York City Council member Annabel Palma in his place.[43][44][45]

Ocasio-Cortez was endorsed by progressive and civil rights organizations such as MoveOn,[46] Justice Democrats,[47] Brand New Congress,[48] Black Lives Matter,[49] and Democracy for America,[34] and by gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Nixon, who, like Ocasio-Cortez, also challenged a longtime incumbent, Andrew Cuomo, in the 2018 New York gubernatorial election.[50]

Governor Cuomo endorsed Crowley, as did both of New York’s U.S. Senators, Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, as well as New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, 11 U.S. Representatives, 31 local elected officials, 31 trade unions, and progressive groups such as the Sierra ClubPlanned Parenthood, the Working Families PartyNARAL Pro-Choice America and Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, among others.[51] California representative Ro Khanna, like Ocasio-Cortez a Justice Democrat,[52] initially endorsed Crowley, later also endorsing Ocasio-Cortez in an unusual dual endorsement.[53]

Following her win, Ocasio-Cortez explained her campaign strategy:

I knew that if we were going to win, the way that progressives win on an unapologetic message is by expanding the electorate. That’s the only way that we can win strategically. It’s not by rushing to the center. It’s not by trying to win spending all of our energy winning over those who have other opinions. It’s by expanding the electorate, speaking to those that feel disenchanted, dejected, cynical about our politics, and letting them know that we’re fighting for them.[54]

Primary election

On June 26, 2018, Ocasio-Cortez received 57.13% of the vote (15,897) to Joe Crowley’s 42.5% (11,761), defeating the 10-term incumbent by almost 15 percentage points.[55] Time called her victory “the biggest upset of the 2018 elections so far”;[56] CNN made a similar statement.[5] The New York Times described Crowley’s loss as “a shocking primary defeat on Tuesday, the most significant loss for a Democratic incumbent in more than a decade, and one that will reverberate across the party and the country”.[34] The Guardian called it “one of the biggest upsets in recent American political history”.[57] Her victory was especially surprising as she was outspent 18–1.[58] Merriam-Webster reported that searches for the word “socialism” spiked 1,500% after her victory.[59] In a sign of her outsider status, as of 11 p.m. on election day Crowley had not phoned Ocasio-Cortez; she believed he did not have her phone number and stated that she did not have his. Earlier in the evening, however, Crowley, an amateur guitarist, had played a cover of Bruce Springsteen‘s “Born to Run” at his election night watch party by way of conceding defeat, having dedicated it to Ocasio-Cortez.[60]

Bernie Sanders congratulated her, saying, “She took on the entire local Democratic establishment in her district and won a very strong victory. She demonstrated once again what progressive grassroots politics can do.”[8] Noam Chomsky saw her victory as “a quite spectacular and significant event”. He believes her win shows a split in the Democratic Party and he thinks that “she was right in saying that the policies she’s outlined should have broad appeal to a very large segment of the population.”[61]

Several commentators noted the similarities between Ocasio-Cortez’s victory over Crowley and Dave Brat‘s 2014 victory over Eric Cantor in the Republican primary for Virginia’s 7th congressional district.[62][63] Like Crowley, Cantor was a high-ranking member in his party’s caucus.[64] After her primary win, Ocasio-Cortez endorsed several progressive primary challengers to Democratic incumbents nationwide,[65] leveraging her fame and spending her political capital in a manner not usually seen even in unexpected primary winners.[66]

Without campaigning for it, Ocasio-Cortez won the Reform Party primary as a write-in candidate in a neighboring congressional district, New York’s 15th, with a total vote count of nine, highest among all 22 write-in candidates. She said she appreciated the show of support, but would decline the nomination.[67][68]

You can read the rest here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexandria_Ocasio-Cortez

Tinsel Korey Supporting Sanders
Tinsel Korey Supporting Sanders

Tinsel Korey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tinsel Korey (born March 25, 1980) is a Canadian actress, best known for portraying the Makah Emily Young in the Twilight Saga films New Moon and Eclipse.

Life and career

Prior to moving to Vancouver, Korey had already appeared in some ads. She then decided in late 2002 to move to Hollywood but was “stopped at the border because she couldn’t prove she was going to come back to Canada. She couldn’t go home though so she called her friend and got on a flight to Vancouver and she’s been there ever since.”[1]

In 2006, Korey was given a small role as a rape victim opposite Callum Keith Rennie in the film Unnatural & Accidental, which told the story of a series of murders of mostly Native American women. The film’s director, Carl Bessai, recalled: “It was one of her first gigs and it was harrowing. She was terrified and Callum is so method, so intense. It was one of those moments where you watch a young actor and you think, ‘This will either really give them the power to act or it will just alienate them.'”[2]

Korey performed as a singer at the 2008 National Aboriginal Achievement Awards.

In between acting roles, Tinsel has been in the studio working on new music at Folded Arms Studio in Chandler, Arizona.

Korey also enjoys boxing, painting, watching hockey, UFC and playing guitar and piano.

Tinsel now spends her time in Los Angeles, Vancouver, and Arizona, with her husband Doug Yazzie, and their 6-year-old Border Collie “Lucky”.

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